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Coffee is Good For Your Skin

October 15th, 2013 11:31 pm

According to recent studies coffee has several health benefits other than keeping you awake most of the day. It is said that just smelling the coffee upon waking up in the morning is good for the brain. The smell of coffee can help resist succumbing to stress due to deprivation of sleep. Other studies on coffee also show that it can lower risks of diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, colon cancer, and even skin cancer. Yes, coffee is good for your skin!

Coffee can keep your skin healthy in a lot of different ways. Other than preventing skin cancer and melanoma-related diseases, coffee has anti-oxidant ingredients that can help:

  • Your skin be free of different radicals that can cause acne, eczema and other skin diseases
  • Improve the flow of micro-cellulars in your skin
  • Break up fatty deposits which cause those ugly cellulite
  • Clear up your skin of acne and other blemishes
  • Act as sunblock and prevent sunburn and wrinkles
  • Absorb and neutralize strong odors such as fish and other smells

How can you get all these skin benefits from coffee? There are two ways. One is to go to a spa that offers coffee treatment, and the other option is to make your own homemade coffee skin care treatment. Here are some suggestions on how to prepare your own coffee skin care products:

  1. Use coffee beans to rub on your damp skin before taking a steam bath or going in a sauna bath. Coffee beans can lightly exfoliate your skin and its rich oils can soften it.
  2. After having your fill of your morning coffee, used coffee grounds can be reused into a variety of skin products:
  • Coffee grounds mixed with olive oil – Apply this mixture all over your cellulite regions, and wrap these areas using plastic wrap. Leave this on for at least 5 minutes, remove the plastic and shower off. This can help reduce cellulites from your body.
  • Coffee grounds mixed with egg white – Apply this on your skin as an exfoliant for softer skin.
  • Coffee grounds mixed with your skin cleanser – This mixture can be your very own coffee exfoliating scrub.
  • Coffee grounds mixed with cocoa powder and whole milk or cream – This mixture is a great smelling facial mask.

Coffee as an ingredient for skin care products have been used by women from Russia, Hawaii, Bali, and South America for several years now. So why not visit your favorite spa or skin product store and check out their line of coffee skin products? Better yet, why not make your own?

Cooking with Wine

October 9th, 2013 2:40 am


In order to cook with wine you need to know what wine is made of and what will be the effect on certain dishes when wine is used in the cooking process.

Wine is made up of water, grape acids, tannins and alcohol. All of these players, individually and together, affect the final result. Alcohol itself is tasteless, but it affects the release of flavour and fragrance molecules from the other components. It helps fats to dissolve and penetrate the food, bringing out hidden flavours. This is a chemical reaction that “ordinary” liquids, like water or stock, or even fats such as butter or oil cannot achieve. For this reason, when wine is added to the pot it should be allowed to simmer, uncovered, so that the alcohol and some of the volume evaporate. Never add wine at the end of cooking.

When red wine is made, the seeds and the skins are in prolonged contact with the grape juice, so red wine is rich in tannins. White wine is low in tannins because the juice does not come into contact with the skin and seeds during fermentation. Thick-skinned grapes (such as cabernet sauvignon) will result in tannin-rich wine, in contrast to thin-skinned varieties (like merlot).

White wine is low in tannins because the juice does not come into contact with the skin and seeds during fermentation. Thick-skinned grapes (such as cabernet sauvignon) will result in tannin-rich wine, in contrast to thin-skinned varieties (like merlot).

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